Sam Raimi on Happy Sad Confused podcast

After years bereft of decent YouTube content of Sam Raimi that goes beyond sound bites into what I really want which are hours of hearty in-depth interviews to geek out on, it finally occurred to me to search podcast archives with the idea that this format allows for longer conversations and perhaps, for Raimi, more comfort because it’s audio-only.

I found two. They are both fantastic, and between them, they arguably contain more Raimi time than all of YouTube combined.

Here’s one: Sam Raimi on Happy Sad Confused #83.

Sam Raimi by Happy Sad Confused

Filmmaker Sam Raimi is a true geek God. Decades later after the original Evil Dead, he has returned to the franchise with the new Starz TV series Ash vs. Evil Dead. Sam chats with Josh about all things Evil Dead from the very early beginnings to the brand new chapter in the series.

Highlights (you have to HEAR them; it’s all in the delivery; just trust me and do it):

16:30: “Your protagonists tend to suffer a great deal… I guess that’s good drama though, in a way.”

“I think it’s more my recognition of a sickness the audience has that I am simply trying to cure.”

31:49: “What do you think your best performance in film has been… I have a fondness for Hudsucker Proxy which I know you co-wrote, and you appear, you’re one of the two kind of idea men.”

(Quoting the film.) “‘An idea man. I like the whole idea of the idea man idea.'”

42:00: His whole story of getting the Spider-man gig is precious.

Kids in the Hall’s Dave Foley on “too soon,” censorship and political correctness.

This whole thing, all day every day. Thank you thank you thank you.

“The idea of people being, ‘Oh, political correctness is ruining the world.’ No, it’s people not understanding what political correctness is. And I think political correctness is basically having a fundamental knowledge of what you’re talking about, and fundamental human empathy.”

Sam Raimi – How Does Horror Comedy Work?

Sam Raimi – How Does Horror Comedy Work? (video essay)

Get 2 free months of Skillshare: http://skl.sh/PatrickH Promo code: PATRICKH Help us make these videos: https://www.patreon.com/patrickhwillems MY VIDEO GEAR http://tinyurl.com/z9kb5ow ______________________________________ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/patrickhwillems FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/patrickhwillems TUMBLR: http://patrickhwillems.tumblr.com/ INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/patrickhwillems ______________________________________ Music by Epidemic Sound

“[Comedy and horror are] the genres that cause the most visceral reactions.”

“While their aims are very different, comedy and horror both affect us on a base level—that sets them apart from other genres.”

“Unlike most horror comedies that have funny parts and scary parts, here [in Evil Dead II] the funny parts are the scary parts, and vice versa.”

“What Raimi recognizes is that the construction of a scare is more or less the same as the construction of a laugh—there’s a setup, and a payoff.”

“His brand of manipulation rests on knowing how we will react to certain things, and aiming to put us through a sort of fun house experience, eliciting the most visceral reaction possible.”

Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn (1987): 10 Things You Didn’t Know

I knew probably most of these… but not all!

Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn (1987): 10 Things You Didn’t Know

Bruce Campbell has been killing it as the iconic Ash Williams on the Starz TV series Ash vs. Evil Dead. But before the TV show, there was the Evil Dead trilogy, directed by Sam Raimi. Today, we’re talking about 10 random facts you may not know about the second Evil Dead film, starting with…

RIP Sam Shepard

“Nobody can disappear. The old man tried that. Look where it got him. He lost his teeth. First he lost his real teeth, then he lost his false teeth. You never knew that did ya’? He never confided in you. Yeah, he lost his real teeth one at a time. Woke up every morning with another tooth lying on the mattress. Finally, he decides he’s gonna’ get ’em all pulled out but he doesn’t have any money. Middle of Arizona with no money and no insurance and every morning another tooth is lying on the mattress. So what does he do? He begs the government. G.I. Bill or some damn thing. Some pension plan he remembers in the back of his head. And they send him out the money. They send him the money but it’s not enough money. Costs a lot to have all yer teeth yanked. They charge by the individual tooth, ya’ know. I mean one tooth isn’t equal to another tooth. Some are more expensive. Like the big ones in the back… So he locates a Mexican dentist in Juarez who’ll do the whole thing for a song. And he takes off hitchhiking to the border. So how long do you think it takes him to get to the border? A man his age. Eight days it takes him. Eight days in the rain and the sun and every day he’s droppin’ teeth on the blacktop and nobody’ll pick him up ’cause his mouth’s full a’ blood. So finally he stumbles into the dentist. Dentist takes all his money and all his teeth. And there he is, in Mexico, with his gums sewed up and his pockets empty. Then I got out to see him, see. I go out there and I take him out for a nice Chinese dinner. But he doesn’t eat. All he wants to do is drink Martinis outa’ plastic cups. And he takes his teeth out and lay’s ’em on the table ’cause he can’t stand the feel of ’em. And we ask the waitress for one a’ those doggie bags to take the Chop Suey home in. So he drops his teeth in the doggie bag along with the Chop Suey. And then we go out to hit all the bars up and down the highway. Says he wants to introduce me to all his buddies. And in one a’ those bars, in one a’ those bars up and down the highway, he left that doggie bag with his teeth laying in the Chop Suey. We went back but we never did find it. Now that’s a true story. True to life.”

Sam Raimi on his signature blend of horror and comedy

“I have found that when the audience is set up for a sequence of suspense, and they expect a scare, oftentimes you can give them a punchline instead, and the buildup to that punchline can work as a suspense sequence.

“The construction of a suspense sequence is very similar to the construction of a joke. And in a horror film, that suspense sequence is capped with a scare, and in a joke, it’s capped with an unexpected punchline, and I find the two can be interchangeable.”

Sam Raimi interviewed by Obsessed With Film

Martyn Conterio catches up with DRAG ME TO HELL director Sam Raimi.

Battlestar Galactica: What The Frak Is Going On?

Battlestar Galactica: What the Frak is Going On?

Download all the episodes at http://watchallepisodeson.tk/

So much of this video made me laugh maniacally and replay bits, mostly because of the delivery.

(Spoiler alert: This is a summary of the first three seasons.)

highlights:

“Starbuck and Apollo like each other, so they beat each other up.”

“when a phone with a cord rings”

“there’s a bun in the toaster”

Stephen King’s It

BILL SKARSGÅRD AS THE CLOWN WHAT

First trailer for Stephen King’s It: the child-devouring clown is back

The first trailer for the latest version of Stephen King’s It has landed, suggesting that yet another generation of children will be haunted by visions of an evil, sewer-dwelling clown. It’s the first of a proposed two-part adaptation of the 1986 novel that was originally turned into a mini-series in 1990, starring Tim Curry as Pennywise, a clown that kidnaps and eats children.

Dean Stockwell

Dean Stockwell

Digging the discovery that Dean Stockwell—who I first watched in “Quantum Leap” when I was a kid and am currently watching in “Battlestar Galactica” and have loved in many things in between—was a child actor in the 40s and has been in the biz ever since. Being a character actor, he’s like the Hollywood version of a ”working musician.” I appreciate the understated, non-hot-shot-star-celebrity actors. They’re more like real people! No Jackie Coogan drama here! 😂

The Continuous Story In The Background Of Many Horror Films + Sam Raimi video

The Continuous Story In The Background Of Many Horror Films

Being a horror fan isn’t easy. You fall in love with a no-bullshit, nightmare-inducing killer, then the next thing you know he’s in Manhattan, going to hell, or bumbling around in space. It was probably never John Carpenter’s intention to have the ultimate opponent of Michael Myers be Mr. Break Ya Neck, either.

This is a fascinating and almost entirely well-researched piece with a huge error.

I hate to be the pedant here (though really I love it) but it did NOT start with Nightmare (however it did start with Wes Craven).

Sam Raimi explains the true origins here, in this video I’ve seen just once or twice, starting at 4:14:

Sam Raimi Rules Of Horror

Sam Raimi Rules Of Horror with Stephen King intro from “This Is Horror”