Tag Archives: Catch-22

George Clooney to Lead ‘Catch-22’ Series for Hulu

George Clooney to Lead ‘Catch-22’ Series for Hulu

George Clooney will direct and star in a six-part limited series based on Joseph Heller’s landmark novel Catch-22 for Hulu, the streaming service announced Sunday. Clooney, who will play the role of Colonel Cathcart for the adaptation, will also executive produce the series about the book that gave birth to the paradoxical “Catch-22.”

Yes. Yes yes yes yes yes yes yes.

I happen to be rereading the book right now. Let’s relive some beautiful moments, shall we?

from the book:

“They were the most depressing group of people Yossarian had ever been with. They were always in high spirits. They laughed at everything. They called him ‘Yo-Yo’ jocularly and came in tipsy late at night and woke him up with their clumsy, bumping, giggling efforts to be quiet, then bombarded him with asinine shouts of hilarious good-fellowship when he sat up cursing to complain. He wanted to massacre them each time they did. They reminded him of Donald Duck’s nephews. They were afraid of Yossarian and persecuted him incessantly with nagging generosity and with their exasperating insistence on doing small favors for him. They were reckless. puerile, congenial, naïve, presumptuous, deferential and rambunctious. They were dumb; they had no complaints. They admired Colonel Cathcart and they found Colonel Korn witty. They were afraid of Yossarian, but they were not the least bit afraid of Colonel Cathcart’s seventy missions. They were four clean-cut kids who were having lots of fun, and they were driving Yossarian nuts.”

from the 1970 movie starring Alan Arkin (also yes):

Dobbs: You don’t really love her. You only think you love her.
Yossarian: How can you tell the difference between loving her and thinking he’s in love?
Dobbs: You have to be objective.
Yossarian: Who’s objective?
Dobbs: I am.
Yossarian: Why?
Dobbs: ‘Cause I’m not in love with her.
Yossarian: You mean you think you’re not.
Dobbs: That’s right.
Yossarian: So how can you tell the difference?

In his work in the city Sammy found himself among Republicans for the first time in his life. Nothing in his background or higher education had conditioned him to expect than anyone but a bandit, sociopath, or ignoramus would ever want to be a Republican.

Joseph Heller, Closing Time

They were the most depressing group of people Yossarian had ever been with. They were always in high spirits. They laughed at everything. They called him ‘Yo-Yo’ jocularly and came in tipsy late at night and woke him up with their clumsy, bumping, giggling efforts to be quiet, then bombarded him with asinine shouts of hilarious good-fellowship when he sat up cursing to complain. He wanted to massacre them each time they did. They reminded him of Donald Duck’s nephews. They were afraid of Yossarian and persecuted him incessantly with nagging generosity and with their exasperating insistence on doing small favors for him. They were reckless. puerile, congenial, naïve, presumptuous, deferential and rambunctious. They were dumb; they had no complaints. They admired Colonel Cathcart and they found Colonel Korn witty. They were afraid of Yossarian, but they were not the least bit afraid of Colonel Cathcart’s seventy missions. They were four clean-cut kids who were having lots of fun, and they were driving Yossarian nuts.

Joseph Heller, Catch-22

Everyone agreed that Clevinger was certain to go far in the academic world. In short, Clevinger was one of those people with lots of intelligence and no brains, and everyone knew it except those who soon found it out.

In short, he was a dope. He often looked to Yossarian like one of those people hanging around modern museums with both eyes together on one side of a face. It was an illusion, of course, generated by Clevinger’s predilection for staring fixedly at one side of a question and never seeing the other side at all. Politically, he was a humanitarian who did know right from left and was trapped uncomfortably between the two. He was constantly defending his Communist friends to his right-wing enemies and his right-wing friends to his Communist enemies, and he was thoroughly detested by both groups, who never defended him to anyone because they thought he was a dope.

He was a very serious, very earnest and very conscientious dope. It was impossible to go to a movie with him without getting involved afterward in a discussion on empathy, Aristotle, universals, messages and the obligations of the cinema as an art form in a materialistic society. Girls he took to the theater had to wait until the first intermission to find out from him whether or not they were seeing a good or a bad play, and then found out at once. He was a militant idealist who crusaded against racial bigotry by growing faint in its presence. He knew everything about literature except how to enjoy it.

Yossarian tried to help him. ‘Don’t be a dope,’ he had counseled Clevinger when they were both at cadet school in Santa Ana, California.

Joseph Heller, Catch-22

another catch-22 from “Catch-22” (film)

Dobbs: You don’t really love her. You only think you love her.
Yossarian: How can you tell the difference between loving her and thinking he’s in love?
Dobbs: You have to be objective.
Yossarian: Who’s objective?
Dobbs: I am.
Yossarian: Why?
Dobbs: ‘Cause I’m not in love with her.
Yossarian: You mean you think you’re not.
Dobbs: That’s right.
Yossarian: So how can you tell the difference?

from “Catch-22” (film)

Nately: America’s the strongest nation on earth. The American fighting man is the best trained, the best equipped, the best fed… Italy, on the other hand, is one of the weakest nations on earth and the ltalian fighting man is hardly equipped at all.
Old man: That’s why my country is doing so well while yours is doing so poorly.
Nately: That’s silly! First ltaly was occupied by Germans and now by us. You call that doing well?
Old man: Of course I do. The Germans are being driven out and we are still here. In a few years, you’ll be gone and we’ll still be here. Italy is a very poor, weak country yet that is what makes us so strong—strong enough to survive this war and still be in existence long after your country has been destroyed.
Nately: What are you talking about? America’s not going to be destroyed.
Old man: Never?
Nately: Well…
Old man: Rome was destroyed. Greece was destroyed. Persia was destroyed. Spain was destroyed. All great countries are destroyed. Why not yours? How much longer do you think your country will last? Forever?
Nately: Forever is a long time, I guess.