Tag Archives: horror

Sam Raimi – How Does Horror Comedy Work?

Sam Raimi – How Does Horror Comedy Work? (video essay)

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“[Comedy and horror are] the genres that cause the most visceral reactions.”

“While their aims are very different, comedy and horror both affect us on a base level—that sets them apart from other genres.”

“Unlike most horror comedies that have funny parts and scary parts, here [in Evil Dead II] the funny parts are the scary parts, and vice versa.”

“What Raimi recognizes is that the construction of a scare is more or less the same as the construction of a laugh—there’s a setup, and a payoff.”

“His brand of manipulation rests on knowing how we will react to certain things, and aiming to put us through a sort of fun house experience, eliciting the most visceral reaction possible.”

Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn (1987): 10 Things You Didn’t Know

I knew probably most of these… but not all!

Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn (1987): 10 Things You Didn’t Know

Bruce Campbell has been killing it as the iconic Ash Williams on the Starz TV series Ash vs. Evil Dead. But before the TV show, there was the Evil Dead trilogy, directed by Sam Raimi. Today, we’re talking about 10 random facts you may not know about the second Evil Dead film, starting with…

Sam Raimi on his signature blend of horror and comedy

“I have found that when the audience is set up for a sequence of suspense, and they expect a scare, oftentimes you can give them a punchline instead, and the buildup to that punchline can work as a suspense sequence.

“The construction of a suspense sequence is very similar to the construction of a joke. And in a horror film, that suspense sequence is capped with a scare, and in a joke, it’s capped with an unexpected punchline, and I find the two can be interchangeable.”

Sam Raimi interviewed by Obsessed With Film

Martyn Conterio catches up with DRAG ME TO HELL director Sam Raimi.

The Continuous Story In The Background Of Many Horror Films + Sam Raimi video

The Continuous Story In The Background Of Many Horror Films

Being a horror fan isn’t easy. You fall in love with a no-bullshit, nightmare-inducing killer, then the next thing you know he’s in Manhattan, going to hell, or bumbling around in space. It was probably never John Carpenter’s intention to have the ultimate opponent of Michael Myers be Mr. Break Ya Neck, either.

This is a fascinating and almost entirely well-researched piece with a huge error.

I hate to be the pedant here (though really I love it) but it did NOT start with Nightmare (however it did start with Wes Craven).

Sam Raimi explains the true origins here, in this video I’ve seen just once or twice, starting at 4:14:

Sam Raimi Rules Of Horror

Sam Raimi Rules Of Horror with Stephen King intro from “This Is Horror”